Berlin, Germany, Part 1/3

Berlin is the capital and the largest city of Germany as well as one of its 16 states. Berlin is the second most populous city and the seventh most populous urban area in the European Union. Located in northeastern Germany on the banks of rivers Spree and Havel, it is the centre of the Berlin-Brandenburg Metropolitan Region. Around one-third of the city’s area is composed of forests, parks, gardens, rivers and lakes.

First documented in the 13th century and situated at the crossing of two important historic trade routes, Berlin became the capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1417–1701), the Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918), the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1919–1933) and the Third Reich (1933–1945). After World War II, the city was divided; East Berlin became the capital of East Germany while West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989) and East Germany territory. Following German reunification in 1990, Berlin once again became the capital of a unified Germany.

Berlin is a world city of culture, politics, media and science. Berlin serves as a continental hub for air and rail traffic and has a highly complex public transportation network. The metropolis is a popular tourist destination.

Berlin is home to world renowned universities, orchestras, museums, entertainment venues and is host to many sporting events. The city is well known for its festivals, diverse architecture, nightlife, contemporary arts and a high quality of living.

Below are some photos of a short visit to this city. The TV tower at Alexanderplatz, St. Mary Church (Marienkirche), Christmas markets, Berlin Cathedral, Museum Island (Museum Insel), Brandenburger Gate (Brandenburger Tor), Russian War Memorial and some more. Click on a miniature-photo to enlarge it, then navigate using the arrows left/right of the photo or use the cursor keys on your keyboard.