Belfast, Ireland

Belfast is the capital city of Northern Ireland, located on the banks of the River Lagan on the east coast of Ireland. It is the largest city in Northern Ireland and second largest city in Ireland.

By the early 1800s the town was home to a major port. Belfast played a key role in the Industrial Revolution in the 19th century, becoming the biggest linen producer in the world. By the time it was granted city status in 1888, it was a major centre of the Irish linen as well as tobacco-processing, rope-making and shipbuilding industries. Harland and Wolff, which built the RMS Titanic, was the world’s biggest and most productive shipyard. It became the capital of Northern Ireland following the Partition of Ireland in 1922. Its status as a global industrial centre ended in the decades after the Second World War.

The city suffered greatly during ‘the Troubles’, and was once considered in the 1970s and 1980s as one of the world’s most dangerous cities. But since the 21st century the city has undergone a sustained period of calm, free from the intense political violence of former years, and substantial economic and commercial growth.

Below are some photos made during a visit to this city in may 2018. The Titanic museum, wall paintings, Belfast City Hall, the harbor and more. Click on a miniature-photo to enlarge it, then navigate using the arrows left/right of the photo or use the cursor keys on your keyboard.