Abbatia Territorialis Montis Cassini (Abbey Of Monte Cassino), Italy

Monte Cassino is a rocky hill about 130 kilometres southeast of Rome, in the Latin Valley, Italy, 2 kilometres to the west of the town of Cassino and 520 m altitude. It is best known for its benedictine abbey, the first house of the Benedictine Order, having been established by Benedict of Nursia himself around 529.

The history of Monte Cassino is linked to the nearby town of Cassino. During the Battle of Monte Cassino in the Italian Campaign of World War II (January–May 1944) the Abbey was heavily damaged. On 15 February 1944 the abbey was almost completely destroyed in a series of heavy American-led air raids. Following the bombing the ruins of the monastery were occupied by German Fallschirmjäger (paratroopers) of the 1st Parachute Division, because the ruins provided excellent defensive cover.

The Abbey was rebuilt after the war. In the early 1950s, President of the Italian Republic Luigi Einaudi gave considerable support to the rebuilding. Pope Paul VI consecrated the rebuilt Basilica on 24 October 1964.

Below are some photos made during a visit to the abbey of Monte Cassino. Click on a miniature-photo to enlarge it, then navigate using the arrows left/right of the photo or use the cursor keys on your keyboard.

Camera: Nikon D850
Lens: Sigma 24-105mm f4 DG OS HSM | Art